Stories about life in Denmark

Danish Vikings, or how to find Vikings in today’s Denmark

I play a little game sometime when I look at Danish people. I imagine them as Danish Vikings. It’s easy now that big beards are in fashion on young men. Sometimes on the metro I’ll look up at the hipster guy playing with his iPhone next to me and imagine him wearing a big fur cloak. Maybe a rope belt, with a sword dangling from it.

I imagine him stepping off the boat in Newfoundland in the year 1000, freaking out the local American Indians.

Imagining Danish women as Vikings is a little harder. They don’t usually have the long braids or wear the big golden brooches that Viking ladies used to fasten their dresses. They don’t wear the headscarves the married women used to wear. Of course, you can still see plenty of headscarves in Denmark, but usually not on the Danes.

Choosing Viking-era plumbing
Anyway, the Danes love the Vikings, the same way the same way the French love the age of the Impressionists, and the British love the Second World War, and the Chinese love the 2008 Olympics. It was a time when their country was at the peak of power and influence.

If you go to the Denmark’s National Museum in Copenhagen, you can spend hours looking at Viking handicrafts: lots of golden horns, and rune stones. Danish kids learn a lot about the Vikings at school – even in kindergarden, they make Viking shields, and Viking swords, and try out Viking handicrafts. There’s various places around the country where the whole family can ‘live like a Viking’ for a week. That means Viking-era clothing, Viking-era food, and Viking-era plumbing.

Unsaid in all this is that Vikings were not just fun guys who wore horned hats to soccer games. The Norse pagans were a gruesome people, by modern standards. Their religion involved a lot of human sacrifice, including young children, particularly young girls. Viking is the Norse word for pirate. When they took off on a raid in England, or France, they stole everything they could, they attacked women and girls, they burned down people’s homes, they hacked off people’s limbs with axes. All that scary stuff you see in horror movies, with fake blood, the Vikings actually did. These guys were not cute and cuddly. They were villains. They were bad guys.

Of course, your Danish friends will tell you, the people you’ll meet in Denmark today are not the descendants of the Vikings. The Vikings, they’ll tell you, were the guys who left. They settled what is now England or France. The people you meet today in Denmark are the descendants of the people who didn’t want to go anywhere.

Tell them you want to work together
The current Danes are peaceful people. But there are still some things they have in common with the Vikings, and not just the way they scream bloody murder at you in the bicycle lanes.

For example, they still love the sea and the water. Denmark wins its Olympic medals for sailing, more than any other sport, followed by rowing and canoeing.

And they still think communally. The Vikings lived communally, in what were called ‘long houses’, with many families living inside. People lived together and worked together to survive the tough Scandinavian winters.

Understanding this can help you in your daily life in Denmark. If you want Danish people to do something, tell them you want to work together on it.

For example, Let’s work together to stop your kid from hitting my kid in the sandbox. Or Let’s work together to figure out the best way to share our corporate resources. That’s code for ‘I want a raise.’

Samarbejde is the Danish word for working together. Another good word, if you’re dealing with people on the left side of the political spectrum, is solidarisk. Solidarity. Some of the parents at my child’s school wanted to throw a fancy party which I didn’t want to attend or pay for, but it was decided that we all had to pay whether we attended or not, for reasons of solidarity. Communal thinking.

One word you should not use
So you can talk about working together, co-operation, co-ordination, but there’s a similar English word you should avoid, and that’s collaboration. In English, to collaborate just means working together. Rhianna and Jay-Z are going to collaborate on a new tune.

In Danish, kollaborere does not mean working together. It means working with the enemy. A kollaboratør is somebody who works with an occupying power, like certain Danes who collaborated with the Nazis during the 1940s.

If you use the English version of collaborate, Danish people will probably understand the difference…but the word has a nasty flavor. It brings back memories of a bad time in Danish history…of some gruesome villains that are a lot more recent and well-documented than…the Vikings.
 

Hear all our How to Live in Denmark podcasts on Spotify and on Apple Podcasts (iTunes).

 

Get the How to Work in Denmark Book for more tips on finding a job in Denmark, succeeding at work, and understanding your Danish boss. It can be ordered via Amazon or Saxo.com or from any bookstore using the ISBN 978-743-000-80-8. Contact Kay to ask about bulk purchases, or visit our books site to find out how to get the eBook. You can also book a How to Work in Denmark event with Kay for your school, company, or professional organization.

 

 

 

 

 

Want to read more? Try the How to Live in Denmark book, available in paperback or eBook editions, and in English, Chinese, and Arabic. If you represent a company or organization, you can also book Kay Xander Mellish to stage a How to Live in Denmark event tailored for you, including the popular How to Live in Denmark Game Show. Kay stages occasional free public events too. Follow our How to Live in Denmark Facebook page to keep informed.

Image mashup copyright Kay Xander Mellish 2019

Working in Denmark or hoping to find a job in Denmark? Get the How to Work in Denmark Book for tips on finding a job, succeeding at work, and understanding your Danish boss. It can be ordered via Amazon or Saxo.com or from any bookstore using the ISBN 978-8-743-000-80-8. Contact Kay to ask about bulk purchases, including special orders with your company logo. You can also plan a How to Work in Denmark event with Kay for your school, company, or professional organization.

How to Live in Denmark is the updated version of our very first book based on the popular podcast and the essays you’ll see on this site. You can purchase it on Amazon and Saxo.com, or get the original book on Google Play in English, Chinese, and Arabic. You can also book Kay Xander Mellish to stage an event tailored for your company or organization, including the popular How to Live in Denmark Game Show, a great way for Danes and internationals to have fun together.

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7 Comments

  • Avatar
    Reply April February 3, 2014 at 2:15 pm

    So very insightful. I can’t stop reading.. Thank you, Kay:)

  • Avatar
    Reply Ambroz February 11, 2014 at 5:47 pm

    I like your voice, I like your stories, and I like Denmark as well.

  • Avatar
    Reply Palle Rasmussen January 26, 2017 at 7:04 am

    “The Vikings, they’ll tell you, were the guys who left. They settled what is now England or France. The people you meet today in Denmark are the descendants of the people who didn’t want to go anywhere.”

    Not really. Those who went and stayed there, were- generally speaking- those who could not hack it in the intense power struggles at home. Many who were succesful at home did it by going out and coming back with lots of riches and a great reputation as a warlord. Thus being able to build stronger personal alliances which power rested upon. I shall gladly send you my dissertation on the matter 😉

    Best wishes- and glad you like Denmark. Palle Rasmussen, medieval historian and Viking re-enactor in “Vikingekampgruppen Ask”

    PS. If you want to see Vikings, come to the Viking markets during summer. The largest is Moesgaard near Aarhus, and with Aarhus cutural capitol and the market having 40 years anneversary, we should be close to 1000 warriors this summer.

  • Avatar
    Reply Mai-Britt August 13, 2017 at 9:39 am

    The Vikings didn’t have hprns on their helmets. That came later.

    • Avatar
      Reply Kay Xander Mellish August 13, 2017 at 11:37 am

      I think the horns on hats actually came from a guy costuming a Wagnerian opera in the 1880s or 1890s. Would have to do a fact check on that, though.

  • Avatar
    Reply Helga November 26, 2017 at 4:32 pm

    This text is not quite based on facts. The word viking doesn’t mean pirates,but refers to the area of Norway called Viken. It means “people from Viken”. But people from the “Viking area” (south Denmark,Sweden and Norway) were different by clothing and traditions. They were different groups and not one big group,as they seem to be understood today. They were also known by different names when they conquered the world. Swedes were known as the Rus or Varangias in the east along the Volga and Dniepper rivers. Norwegians and Danes conquered then different areas.

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