Stories about life in Denmark

Danes and privacy: Why public nudity is OK & public ambition is not

Shortly before I arrived in Denmark in 2000, one of the famous guards outside the queen’s palace at Amalieborg was fired. You’ve seen these guards in pictures, the Royal Life Guards. They’re dressed like the British palace guards, only with dark blue coats, instead of red. They have the same tall, black, bearskin hats. It’s no big secret that being in the Royal Life Guards is an excellent path to a powerful future in corporate Denmark.

Anyway, the guard that was fired was special. She was the first woman to guard the Royal Palace at Amalieborg. There was a lot written about it in the newspapers at the time. Unfortunately, this young lady also had a part-time job. She was a prostitute. She would guard the palace by day and run her business out of the royal barracks in the evening. She found customers via escort ads in the local newspapers.

So the young lady was fired. But she was NOT fired because she was a prostitute. She was fired because she’d been ordered by her commander to stop moonlighting after her side-job was first discovered, and she did not stop. In fact, she’d been asking her soldier colleagues to drive her to her various nighttime appointments. She was fired for not following orders.

Whatever she wants in her private time
The Danes I talked to didn’t find this case particularly shocking. “It’s her private time, when she’s not at work,” they said. “She can do whatever she wants in her private time.”

That was my introduction to the Danish passion for privacy, and protecting their private life. The word private, itself, is used a lot. You’ll hear Danes talking about their ‘private economy’, which means their personal finances. Two of your colleagues may say they ‘we know each other privately’, which does not mean they’ve seen each other without underwear. It just means they get together on weekends.

Where this relates to you as a foreigner, is when the Danes around you – your colleagues, your neighbors, the people sitting next to you on the Copenhagen metro – don’t want to invade YOUR privacy. This is why they’re not talking to you.

Not being unfriendly; just respecting privacy
Now, me as an American, let’s say I saw a new African family move into my apartment building. I would think that was pretty interesting. I’d probably want to chat with them about where in Africa they came from, what they were doing in Denmark. Maybe bring them some American cookies and see if I could get invited to a meal to taste some food from their country.

But some Danes, not all, but many Danes, would not chat with the African family at all. This is because they are protecting the African family’s privacy. Perhaps the family doesn’t want to talk. Perhaps they have a secret. In Danish eyes, it can be good manners not to disturb them or ask too many questions. The African family might, incorrectly, see this as Danish unfriendliness.

And that’s not just for people from ethnic minorities. I’m blonde and green eyed, Danish speaking, I do not know most of my neighbors in Denmark. When they move in and out of one of the six apartments in my relatively small building, they often don’t say hello when they move in or goodbye when they move out.

I will admit here that I have resorted to Googling my neighbors to find out who they are, and why they might be using a chain saw at 10pm on a Saturday night.

Your age is not private in Denmark
Now, you may see an irony here. You may wonder how people who appear topless on public beaches, or nude in daily newspapers, keep anything private at all.

Well, there are some things that are private in Denmark, and some things that are not.

For example, age. In New York, where I used to live, you didn’t ask women their age. And if you did, you’d probably get lied to. I used to take off five or six years.

In Denmark, everyone knows your age. It’s part of your social security number, which you use for every contact with the government, even checking out library books. If you call to set up an appointment with your doctor, you’ll need to give that number, which includes your birth date. Your age is not private in Denmark.

On the other hand, your personal choices are very private. When I lived in Hong Kong, local Chinese people I had just been introduced to would ask me “Why aren’t you married? Don’t you want children? You’re getting awfully old.”

That’s not the kind of stuff people in Denmark want to discuss with strangers. They also don’t do much office gossip, about who is sleeping with who, or who is cheating on his or her spouse. That’s considered private.

Ambition is embarassing
And some things are private because they are considered embarrassing. Like ambition. Ambition is embarrassing in Denmark, because it suggests that you want to be better than someone else. In an egalitarian society, that’s very bad manners. A recent survey showed that 68% of Danes are not interested in being promoted at work. Maybe that’s because, if you get promoted, whatever extra income you get mostly goes to taxes. But maybe it’s because some Danes were too embarrassed to tell the survey taker that they wanted to get ahead. Ambition is private in Denmark.

Religion is another thing that is very private in Denmark. Even though Denmark is officially a Christian country, and the queen is head of the state church, to be openly Christian, and talk about Jesus or being saved, is considered bad manners. It will make most Danish people very uncomfortable. Many Danes see religion as sort of a security blanket for backward, uneducated people. This is one of the many reasons Danes have so much trouble understanding their Muslim minority.

Contempt for the Bible Belt
Speaking of religion, my Danish friends have a lot of contempt for Bible Belt in the U.S., where people loudly declare their religious fervor, but if you’re, say, gay, you’re expected to hide it, keep it to yourself.

In Denmark, if you’re gay, you can tell everybody – but if you’re religious, particularly deeply religious, you’re expected to hide it, keep it to yourself. That kind of thing is…private.
 

Hear all our How to Live in Denmark podcasts on Spotify and on Apple Podcasts (iTunes).

 

Get the How to Work in Denmark Book for more tips on finding a job in Denmark, succeeding at work, and understanding your Danish boss. It can be ordered via Amazon or Saxo.com or from any bookstore using the ISBN 978-743-000-80-8. Contact Kay to ask about bulk purchases, or visit our books site to find out how to get the eBook. You can also book a How to Work in Denmark event with Kay for your school, company, or professional organization.

 

 

 

 

 

Want to read more? Try the How to Live in Denmark book, available in paperback or eBook editions, and in English, Chinese, and Arabic. If you represent a company or organization, you can also book Kay Xander Mellish to stage a How to Live in Denmark event tailored for you, including the popular How to Live in Denmark Game Show. Kay stages occasional free public events too. Follow our How to Live in Denmark Facebook page to keep informed.

Image mashup copyright Kay Xander Mellish 2019

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4 Comments

  • Avatar
    Reply Svende September 13, 2013 at 8:10 am

    As a Dane I enjoyed reading this. You are right in your observations and as a Dane I still love the lifestyle.

    There is one point where I would love us to change a bit. I don’t mind taking to people in the bus and so on. I like chatting and that’s the one thing I love when traveling aboard.

  • Avatar
    Reply Christian Chipont October 26, 2013 at 2:22 pm

    My wife and me spent some months in Lyngby not long ago. I totally agree with your assesment and found the danes to be respectful and kind.

    Thanks for your column. It makes me feel good and you have a very nice voice in the podcasts.

  • Avatar
    Reply Lars andersen December 18, 2013 at 5:45 pm

    Fantastisk blog og podcasts.
    Jeg håber at du bliver ved, bloggen er både sand og fyldt med god humor.
    Glædelig jul

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