This week's How To Live in Denmark Podcast:
Thoughts on Denmark's offer of Dual Citizenship

Danish Vikings:
They Don't Live Here any More

Denmark is a pretty good place to raise children. Working hours are short, and it’s perfectly OK to leave work at 3 or 4 o’clock to pick up your kids. There’s a good system for early childhood health. And there’s the day care system, which is inexpensive and well-run. It’s also a form of social engineering, creating that equality and community spirit that everyone prizes in Denmark. Day care is the first step in making your child more Danish than wherever you come from.

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The Little Mermaid is Highly Disappointing: Better ideas for visitors to Denmark

It’s spring in Denmark. The evenings are brighter, the winds aren’t quite as chilly, and the wild blue anemone flowers are bursting up through the grass. And the tourists are on the way. Understandably, Denmark attracts most of its tourists during the spring and summer, when you don’t need to pack heavy winter clothing. Although maybe you do – it depends on the summer.

Anyway, the tourists will be coming, and some of those visitors to Denmark may be related to you. What do you do with them? They want the Danish experience.

Based on my 14 years of showing parents, aunts, former colleagues, old college roommates and friends of friends around Denmark, these are my tips. They’re a bit Copenhagen-centeric, but I think most of them can be applied throughout Denmark. And if your listen to the podcast itself, I’ll tell you about an amazing new museum I just found last week.

Start the morning with Danish pastries
First of all, start your tourists in the morning with a trip to the local bakery where they can pick out their own Danish pastry. Or 2 or 3 pastries. I know it’s called Wienerbrod – Viennese bread – but Danish pastries really are some of the best in the world. And some coffee, or black tea. Carbs and caffeine will set your tourists up well for the day’s busy program.

Once your tourists are energized, now is the time to take them walking. Walk them around the old city center, and past the largest, most visible historical monuments in your town. In Copenhagen, you can take them up the Round Tower or to the Queen’s Palace. In Aarhus, maybe tour the Gamle By, in Odense visit Hans Christian Andersen’s home.

Now, part of this trip may take them down a shopping street. This is critical – don’t let them shop yet, or they’ll be carrying bags around all day. Or, if it’s your mom, you’ll be carrying bags around all day. Save the shopping for another time.

Men like Viking artifacts
After you’ve seen the city and the major sites, it might be time for an early lunch. If the weather is good, a picnic in the park is great. Denmark has beautiful parks. Maybe buy a some Danish open-faced sandwiches and some drinks.

If your visitors are elderly – or if they’re rich and will be picking up the tab – a touristy restaurant with Danish food is another option.

Your tourists are now re-energized, so now is a great time for the local museum. I find that men are usually most interested in the Viking artifacts, you know iron sticks with points on the end, while women are more excited about the art and glass museums.

See the Little Mermaid from a boat, with beers
After a day of walking and museums, I recommend a boat trip. You guests can sit down with a chilled Danish beer and see the city from the water. In Copenhagen, these boat trips are a great way to see Denmark’s most disappointing tourist attraction, the statue of the Little Mermaid.

If you’ve seen it, you know the Little Mermaid is only about four feet tall – that’s 1.25 meters. You probably own pillows that are bigger than the Little Mermaid. But all the boat trips go right by it, so your tourists can get the photos they need for their Instagram or Facebook feeds.

If they want, they can climb out of the boat and onto the slippery rock where the mermaid sits for a photo. That’s best performed before too many beers have been consumed.

Hear the full podcast about taking tourists around Denmark in The Little Mermaid is Highly Disappointing: Better ideas for visitors to Denmark in your browser, or subscribe to the podcast for free on iTunes.

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Raising Children in Denmark: Jantelov begins in day care

If you stay in Denmark for longer than a semester or a single work assignment , you, too, may find yourself having children here, as I have. My daughter is now almost ten years old.

It’s not a bad thing. Denmark is a pretty good place to raise children. Working hours are shorter, and it’s perfectly OK to leave work at 3 or 4 o’clock to pick up your kids. There’s a good system for early childhood health. A nurse visits to your home when your child is a baby, and then there are regular checkups with doctor. If your child has the sniffles, you can take off work and stay home with her – the first two days are paid.

And, of course, there’s the day care system. It’s not free, but it’s reasonably priced, and it’s nice to be able to drop off your kid in a safe place with trained people while you go to work.

In some countries, there’s a lot of controversy about whether very young children should be in day care or at home with their parents. Not in Denmark. 97% of kids go to day care, even the children of the Royal Family. Even the future king, currently known as the eight-year-old Prince Christian, went to day care.

Everyone goes to day care partly because the Danish tax structure means both parents have to go to work.

But Danish day care is also social engineering. It’s about creating that equality and community spirit that everyone prizes in Denmark. Day care is the first step in making your child more Danish than wherever you come from.

No elite education, no competition
The Jante Law is part of all Danish education. There’s no elite education here, no advanced, or gifted and talented programs. If you child is better than the others at a certain subject, his job is to help the students who are not as good.

If you come from a very competitive society – the US, the UK, China, India – that can be a bit of a shock. There’s no competition in Danish education. The kids work in groups. There are no competitive schools you have to fight to get into. There’s no standardized testing until the kids are 15 or 16. And there are relatively few tests within the daily school lessons.

In Danish school, your child’s social life is considered what’s most important. Does she have friends? Can she get along with the other children in the class? Does he like to go to school? Does he fit in?

The idea is that if a child is socially comfortable in school, if he or she wants to go to school, then academic success will follow.

Hear the full podcast about raising children in Denmark Raising Children in Denmark: Jantelov begins in day care in your browser, or subscribe to the podcast for free on iTunes.

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The Things I Do Double: Thoughts on Denmark’s offer of Double Citizenship

There was big news this week for foreigners in Denmark. It looks dual citizenship will soon be permitted. Previously, if you wanted to be a Danish citizen, you had to give up citizenship in your home country.

Meanwhile Danes who had moved abroad, say to the US or Australia, and became citizens there had to give up their Danish citizenship.

There’s now been a proposal to get rid of all that. It hasn’t been finally approved, but all the Danish parties say they’ll vote for it, with the exception of our anti-foreigner friends in the Danish People’s Party.

Now having been here for 14 years, I will probably apply for Danish citizenship. I realize I’ll have to do a lot of studying about Danish history, and learn things like the difference between King Christian the Fourth and King Christian the Seventh.

But that’s true of any country. I’m sure people wanting to be American citizens have to learn the difference between, say, George Washington and George Bush.

Carrying the Danish flag
I want to be a Danish citizen for a lot of different reasons. Right now, my ‘permanent’ residence permit expires if I’m out of the country for more than a year. That could easily happen if I travel, or have a family crisis back in the US.

Also my daughter has no rights here. She was born here, and has only lived here, but she has no residence rights here, or right to attend university here. Under the current law, she’d have to apply for a Danish residence permit when she turns 18, and there’s no guarantee she’d get it.

If I’m a double citizen, she can become a double citizen. And if she’s a double citizen, it means she can carry the Danish flag in her girls marching band. Right now she’s not allowed.

Hear the full podcast about dual citizenship in Denmark The Things I Do Double: Thoughts on Denmark’s offer of Double Citizenship in your browser, or subscribe to the podcast for free on iTunes.

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Salaam and Goddag: Denmark for Muslims

There’s a new mosque opening down the street from me this spring, a big one. It will be the first mosque with minarets in Denmark, although the minarets are legally prohibited from calling to prayer.

The people behind the mosque are doing everything they can to blend in with the local neighborhood – they even went to observe at a local church service a couple of Sundays ago. They were probably the only ones there.

There are a lot of Muslims in Denmark, about 250,000 out of a Danish population of 5-and-a-half million, most of who have arrived here in the past 40 years, or their descendants.

And contrary to what the Danish right-wing parties might say, they’ve brought a a lot of good things to Denmark, and not just Shwarma shops.

The corner kiosk
Just the fact that corner kiosks exist was a Muslim innovation in Denmark. When I first visited Denmark in 1984, all the shops closed at 5:30 on weekdays and 2pm on Saturdays, and they were closed all day Sunday. If you ran out of milk on a Sunday, you had to borrow from a neighbor or just drink beer until Monday morning. The kiosks run by Muslim immigrants changed all that.

These days, Muslim women in particular have a lot to offer a lot to Danish culture. If you go into any pharmacy in Denmark, you will probably find at least one female pharmacist wearing a headscarf.

I had a similar experience when I did a tour of the Rigshospitalitet, Denmark’s largest and most prestigious hospital, where all the royal babies are born. In the bloodwork division, where they test blood, almost all the workers were Muslim women wearing headscarves.

These jobs are a way for devout Muslim women to enter the medical field without having to touch men, or seen men unclothed. I thought that was great.

As a matter of fact, the statistics show girls from second generation and third generation immigrant backgrounds in Denmark now attain higher educational credentials than ethnic Danes. Now, all those girls are not Muslims, but a lot of them are.

Muslims ask if this is a good place to live
At How To Live in Denmark.com, I get a fair amount of email from Muslims who have write to me, asking if Denmark is a good place for them to live.

It is a good place. All the things that are good about Denmark for other people – that it’s a peaceful country, a safe country, a country where you can earn a good living and still have time for your family – are also good for Muslims.

I also tell the people who write to me that, in a multicultural world, it’s fair enough to ask the Danes to adapt to and accept different ways of living, but you have to adapt and accept, too.

Hear the full podcast about Muslims in Denmark at Salaam and Goddag: Denmark for Muslims in your browser, or subscribe to the podcast for free on iTunes.

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Danish Stereotypes: The superficial American and the Copenhagen cheater

I don’t date much these days – I’m a single mother with a full-time job and weekly podcast – but back in the days when I did date, I occasionally dated online. Dating online is very popular in Denmark. It seems to be where everyone over the age of 25 meets a partner.

One guy contacted me and said. “You know, an American girl broke my heart very badly once. I hope you’re not like her.”

I never went out with the guy. That’s a hell of a history to live up to. And I believe that’s why a lot of Muslim guys have trouble dating in Denmark. Everyone knows some girl who went out with a good-looking Muslim and it didn’t work out. And you, ordinary Muslim guy, are paying the price for someone else’s heartbreak.

Is that right? No. But Danes, like any other nationality, are not immune to stereotypes.

Now, I see this myself, in my daily life. For example, Danes love stories about American right-wing nutcases. Newspapers are full of them. Whenever some Republican fool says something that makes no sense he is guaranteed front-page treatment in the Danish media. Unborn babies have a right to guns! Top of the Danish news.

Those people do exist in the United States but they’re like what – 3% of the population? There are 350 million of us – we’re entitled to some idiots! But whenever I meet Danes, and they are eager to tell me how much they disapprove of these people.

I’m also told regularly that Americans are superficial. Danes seem particularly upset by the common American greeting ‘How ya doin’?’ “You know, the cashier at Wal-Mart asked me ‘How ya doin’?’, but she didn’t really care how I was doing.”

There are Danish stereotypes about other nationalities as well. Spaniards and Italians are seen as fun and sexy and romantic, but unlikely to arrive on time. Eastern Europeans work too hard, at wages that are much too low, at least by Danish standards. Asian immigrants are seen as OK because they work hard at things Danes aren’t really interested in, like high-level engineering degrees.

Danes also have stereotypes about other Nordic people. Norwegians are seen as happy, friendly people with a humorous language. Everything sounds funny in Norwegian because everything sounds like singing.

Swedes are seen as kind of stiff, humorless types who can’t dance, and can’t hold their liquour. Finns are silent, angry drunks that carry knives. Oddly, given their history, Danes really like Germans. Really, really like the Germans. Many Danes will say that Berlin is their favorite town.

Danes also have stereotypes about each other, something that amazed me when I first arrived here. You have 5 million people, and you’re dividing yourselves into groups! But Danes themselves see a big difference between people from Sjelland, the island with Copenhagen on it, and Jylland, the bigger part of Denmark that is connected to Germany.

Learn more about Danish stereotypes: listen to the podcast Danish Stereotypes: The superficial American and the Copenhagen cheater in your browser, or subscribe to the podcast for free on iTunes.

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Danish Names: Why Bent is not bent, and why it’s bad to be Brian

Danish first names are very strongly stratified by age.

Ole and Finn and Knud and Kaj and Jørn and Jørgen and to some extent Poul and Per, are almost always over 50. Their female counterparts, their wives and sisters and secret lovers, are Inger and Karin and Kirsten and Ulla.

Or Bente. A nearly guaranteed old ladies’ name is Bente. Or Bent, the male equivalent. Being named Bent is a problem for Danes who travel, because in many English-speaking countries, ‘bent’ is old-fashioned slang for ‘gay.’

In those countries, if you hold out your hand and say, ‘Hi, I’m Bent,’ you may get an unexpected reaction.

I once knew a Danish executive named Bent who was sent to work in the UK, once. While he was there, he called himself Ben – no ‘t’. He even had ‘Ben’ put on his business cards.

There’s always a Søren

If you’re in business, it’s good to have these insights about names before you go to a meeting, because you can get an idea who’s going to be on the other side of the table.

If it’s Søren or Mette you’re going to meet with, it’s someone mid-career, maybe in their 40s. When I first got to Denmark, I used to joke that you could get into any party by saying “Yeah, I’m a good friend of Søren” because there was always a Søren. Pia, Rikke, Trine, Pernille, Jesper, Steen, Kim, these are the middle-aged, middle-management names of Denmark today.

But if you’re supposed to meet with Rasmus or Sofie or Maja or Magnus, you’re probably going to be talking to someone younger, and potentially smarter, than you are. These are the names of Danish people in their 20s.

Heroic baby names

These days the hippest names to give Danish babies are very old-fashioned Viking names. Valdemar. Gertrude. Holger. Holger Danske is a legendary figure who is supposed to arise from the grave and save Denmark in its difficult moments. The next Holger Danske may be your local day care right now, dribbling organic carrot juice onto his blanket.

Learn more about decoding Danish first names in the podcast ‘How to find a job in Denmark: It’s not easy, but it can be done’ in your browser, or subscribe to the podcast for free on iTunes.

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How to find a job in Denmark: It’s not easy, but it can be done

Getting a job in Denmark is not easy, but it can be done. It depends a lot on what you can do. And what you can do better than a Dane.

Because, let’s be frank here. If it’s between you and a Danish person, they’re going to hire the Danish person.

The Danish person knows the language, the Danish person knows the culture, the Danish person knows not to bring Brie cheese to the Friday shared breakfast.

Riberhus sliced cheeseIn every Danish office I’ve ever worked in, there’s been a Friday shared breakfast, and they always eat exactly the same cheese. Sliced, medium-sharp Riberhus Danbo cheese.

Sometimes I would try to bring a different cheese and my Danish colleagues would smile and nod like they do when a foreigner has done something silly … and then not eat my cheese. They’d eat no cheese at all until someone brought out the sliced, medium-sharp Riberhus Danbo cheese. My daughter and I call it ‘Danish people cheese.’

Anyway, the Danish workplace is about teams, and working together, and getting along as a group, and there’s an automatic suspicion that a foreigner might not fit into that. Back to my original point – to find a job in Denmark, you have to show what you can do better than your Danish rivals.

Learn more about finding a job in Denmark in the podcast ‘How to find a job in Denmark: It’s not easy, but it can be done’ in your browser, or subscribe to the podcast for free on iTunes.

Link to Fiverr, where you can have your LinkedIn profile, CV or cover letter proofread for only US$5. One tip: give your proofreader plenty of time, as they are often not very speedy.

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Dating in Denmark is difficult, because the process works in much of the rest of the Western world doesn’t work in Denmark. In most parts of the world, a man will see a woman he likes, and he’ll approach her. He’ll try to start a conversation. Maybe he’ll ask if he can buy her a coffee, or some other type of drink. If they’re in a nightclub, he might ask her if she’d like to dance, or maybe go outside and get some fresh air. These tactics will get you nowhere in Denmark.

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I saw a Danish movie recently that contained a romance, and it struck me that the male romantic lead was visibly shorter than the female lead. I’d say at least a couple of centimeters shorter, maybe an inch. Now, in Hollywood, they’d have that guy standing on a box, to look taller, or have the actress standing in a hole, to look shorter. In the Danish film, there was no attempt to hide it. In Hollywood – or Bollywood – movies, the male actor is taller because he’s supposed to be in charge, the dominant figure. But that’s not true in Danish romance. The man is NOT in charge.

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Dating in Denmark, Part 2: Dating Danish men; a guide for the foreign woman

If you are a romance novelist, the Danish man is not your dream man. He will not write poetry and pursue his beloved to the ends of the Earth. He won’t send flowers, he won’t buy chocolates. He won’t even hold the door open for you to walk through.

That said, if you’re a feminist, a Danish man IS your dream man. He will cook and help with the housework, and spend time with the kids. He’ll respect your opinion, and he won’t force himself on you. In fact, you may have to force yourself on him. But if you do, he’ll usually be really grateful.

Chivalry doesn’t pay
Why are Danish men like this? I’ve asked my Danish male friends, and they say they’re reacting to Danish women. Danish women, they say, like to do things for themselves. They don’t want some clown opening the door for them, or helping them carry packages. They can carry their own packages.Danish man

My Danish male friends say that after offering to be chivalrous a couple of times and getting turned down in a nasty manner, they don’t want to do that any more.

So, the Danish male approach is largely passive. They wait to see if the woman is interested. I get a lot of mail from non-Danish women trying to figure out if the Danish man they’re dating is interested in them. He’s really happy when I call him, but he never calls me.

Don’t expect whistles
I honestly don’t know what to tell them. I mean, I come from a culture where men whistle at beautiful women they don’t know walking down the street. When I first moved to Denmark, I thought I’d stopped hearing whistles because I’d aged out of the whistle target group.

But I’ve since established that beautiful young women don’t get whistled at either. Danish men do not want to offend women.

Learn more about dating rules in Denmark in the podcast ‘Dating in Denmark, Part 2: Dating Danish men; a guide for the foreign woman’ in your browser, or subscribe to the podcast for free on iTunes.

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Dating in Denmark, Part 1: Meeting Danish women; a guide for the foreign man

Dating in Denmark is hard, even for the Danes, and it will probably be hard for you too.

Who?

That’s because the dating process that works in much of the rest of the Western world doesn’t work in Denmark. In most parts of the world, a man will see a woman he likes, and he’ll approach her. He’ll try to start a conversation. Maybe he’ll ask if he can buy her a coffee, or some other type of drink. If they’re in a nightclub, he might ask her if she’d like to dance, or maybe go outside and get some fresh air.

Men, these tactics will get you nowhere in Denmark. In fact, they will get you rejected, and then you’ll worry that that you’re being rejected because you’re a foreigner. No. Danes are not good with strangers, any type of stranger. Generally, they don’t talk to strangers. They talk to their friends.

I’ll tell you how to get around this in a minute.

Things that will get you rejected
But first, let me tell you about another thing that will get you rejected. I’ll call it Manhattan behavior, because it was the way people dated when I lived in New York City. Men would tell a lady how much money they made, and how much money they were going to make, how much power and influence they had, and how expensive their watch was.

This will get you nowhere in Denmark. First of all, if you have money in Denmark, the government’s going to take it all away. The tax department will have your number, real fast.

Learn more about dating rules in Denmark in the ‘DATING IN DENMARK, PART 1: Meeting Danish women; a guide for the foreign man’ podcast in your browser, or subscribe to the podcast for free on iTunes.

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More Snow Tomorrow: Surviving Winter as a Foreigner in Denmark – Podcast #25

Everyone suffers a little bit during the winter in Denmark. But I feel particularly bad for people I can see come from warmer climates, and are experiencing one of their first winters here.

In Copenhagen the other day, I saw a pretty young woman – she looked like a newlywed – wearing traditional Pakistani dress. A light chiffon tunic, soft pajama pants, little leather slippers – and then a giant parka over the top. All around her was grey, slushy snow. I got the sense that she was a new bride whose husband hadn’t really given her the full story about Denmark and Danish winter. She looked so cold and unhappy.

I also feel bad for the African migrant workers I see here. They’re often wearing kind of cool-looking leather jackets, which they probably get when they pass through Italy, and not much else in the way of winter clothing. I sometimes see one of these dark guys fighting his way through a white cloud of windy snow. And the look on his face is not full of love for Denmark.

Of course, immigrants to Denmark adapt to the cold after a while. I think Muslim women have it best, because they often wear a head covering every day anyway.

Danes, on the other hand, often go bare-headed all winter.

Wooly Christmas presents
You see Danish people packed in like wooly Christmas presents, scarves, gloves, coats, waterproof boots, sometimes waterproof trousers – and no hat. Amazing. And it’s not just young people.

I see elderly women in fancy fur coats – fur is entirely acceptable in Denmark, by the way – old women in fur coats and expensive leather gloves…walking through the parking lot to their Audi or Mercedes with…no hat.

But there’s still a lot to learn from the Danes on how to get through the cold winters.

First of all, if they can avoid them, they do.

Lots of people travel to warmer places during the winter, particularly the Danish Royal Family. When the weather is at its worst, they always seem to have an urgent ribbon to cut in Australia or the south of France.

Hear the rest of this story in the ‘Winter in Denmark’ podcast in your browser, or subscribe to the podcast for free on iTunes.

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Danes and Vikings, plus: Two words to use to get Danish people to do what you want – Podcast #24

Danish_VikingI play a little game sometime when I look at Danish people. I imagine them as Vikings.

It’s easy now that big beards are in fashion on young men. Sometimes on the metro I’ll look up at the hipster guy playing with his iPhone next to me and imagine him wearing a big fur cloak. Maybe a rope belt, with a sword dangling from it.

I imagine him stepping off the boat in Newfoundland in the year 1000, freaking out the local American Indians.

Imagining Danish women as Vikings is a little harder. They don’t usually have the long braids or wear the big golden brooches that Viking ladies used to fasten their dresses. They don’t wear the headscarves that the married Viking women used to wear. Of course, you can still see plenty of headscarves in Denmark, but usually not on the Danes.

Viking_small 1
Anyway, the Danes love the Vikings, the same way the same way the French love the age of the Impressionists, and the British love the Second World War, and the Chinese love the 2008 Olympics. It was a time when their country was at the peak of power and influence.

If you go to the Denmark’s National Museum in Copenhagen, you can spend hours looking at Viking handicrafts: lots of golden horns, and rune stones. Danish kids learn a lot about the Vikings at school – even in kindergarden, they make Viking shields, and Viking swords. There’s various places around the country where the whole family can ‘live like a Viking’ for a week. That means Viking-era clothing, Viking-era food, and Viking-era plumbing.

Unsaid in all this is that Danish Vikings were not just fun guys who wore horned hats to soccer games. The Norse pagans were a gruesome people, by modern standards.

Hear the rest of this story in the ‘Danes and Vikings’ podcast in your browser, or subscribe to the podcast for free on iTunes.

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Danes and Work: My vacation flight was cancelled, because the pilot was on vacation

evie_1_9A few years ago, during the peak July vacation season, SAS had to cancel a large number of flights out of Denmark.

This is because too many SAS pilots had taken vacation…during the vacation season.

Now, SAS promised that would never happen again, and to my knowledge, it hasn’t.

But this is part of a wider culture in Denmark, that the needs of the employee are often seen as more important than the needs of the customer.

World’s most efficient workers
Danes are excellent workers. In fact, they’re some of the most efficient workers in the world. They work very short hours, but they work hard. You rarely meet someone incompetent in Denmark.

But Danes also demand a lot of their employers. A full-time employee gets more than 5 weeks of paid vacation a year, 6 if you count the Danish public holidays. Employers also contribute to a vacation fund, so you can enjoy your holiday.

If you get a job at a big company in Denmark, you’ll have a pension, and probably life insurance. Big companies will even pay for private health care, so you don’t have to wait in line for the public health service.

Membership in the fruit plan
Even smaller companies usually offer a lunch plan, so you can get tasty food at a low price without leaning the office, and a fruit plan, so every employee gets a couple of healthy snacks per day.

These are seen as rights, not benefits. There was a front-page piece in the newspaper Politiken last week about temporary employees, some of whom were not paid for days off on public holidays and not allowed to be part of the fruit plan. This was seen as really outrageous.

Although it’s not universal, you won’t have to go far in Denmark to find someone with the idea that a job is there to serve them, as opposed to them serving the job.

Hear the rest of this story in the ‘Danes and Work’ podcast in your browser, or subscribe to the podcast for free on iTunes.

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Gossip and Scandal in Denmark – Podcast #22

In general, Danes are not gossips, particularly about the sex lives of people they know. A few years ago, at a work party, I saw two co-workers who were married to other people leave with the party with their arms around each other. When I mentioned it to some other colleagues at lunch on Monday, their sudden silence made it clear that they felt the person who was behaving improperly – was me.

But there are some people whom, it is generally agreed, it’s OK to gossip about. This set of people appears in the weekly Danish weekly color tabloids, sold at every supermarket and kiosk.

We’re talking about anchors on local news channels, football players and their girlfriends, the stars and judges of reality shows. In these weekly newspapers, they openly discuss their romances, or lack of them, their children, or lack of them, their beach vacations, and the hats and dresses they wear to galas….there are a surprising number of galas in Denmark.

The really juicy gossip and scandal in Denmark is about the Danish Royal Family. It’s the world’s longest-running soap opera – more than a thousand years old and still going strong. There are lots of happy stories about the Royal Family in every edition of the tabloids. Happy, happy, happy. They are spending family time together! They are going to galas! They are an inspiration to us all!

But behind the happy family pictures, outside the tabloids, there is an entirely different undercurrent of royal gossip.

Hear the full podcast here, or subscribe for free on iTunes.

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Rather read? Try out the podcast transcripts.

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